Tag Archives: hypergraphia

Blogsy

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I pretty much never write posts like this. But the reason I've been able to post more recently is an app called Blogsy. I really have trouble using the WordPress site, and even the WordPress app for some reason. I've had trouble learning to use Blogsy, but now that I know how to use it (for WordPress at least), it makes things very easy in ways I didn't know were possible.

I don't know if it exists for other platforms, but it exists for iPad, which is my primary communication device (using Proloquo2Go) these days. I've heard of it existing for iPhone and iPod Touch, but I've heard the opposite too, and I don't see them in the app store, so I don't know what's going on there.

For some reason I don't understand, it also makes it enjoyable to post things. That seems like a weird thing to say. But for whatever reason, it happens to be true. I don't know if that's because of me, the app, or both. And making something enjoyable doesn't always make it possible to do something, but it at least makes it easier.

It's the sort of thing where when I was younger, I used to type random things into word processors and stuff just because using them was fun. If I'd had a blog when I was a kid, and this app was around, I doubt anyone else would have enjoyed reading it. Because I would mostly be posting random stuff just to use the app. This post of course couldn't possibly qualify as a slightly more complicated version of the same thing. ;-)

What historians don’t pathologize.

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Another short one but at least I’m posting. It’s something I just remembered while thinking about history. 

I’ve written about hypergraphia before. It’s the medicalized term for compulsive writing (just one form of compulsion-level creativity thought to be linked to temporal lobe oddities, and it’s a way I’ve been described before). It doesn’t have to be any particular kind of writing though. I used to just write lists, or write the words of a book over and over. Many people described as hypergraphic write incredibly detailed journals going over every minute of the day. 

I was telling someone about this years ago. Turns out she was a history major. Her response was “Oh historians love people like that!  That’s how they find out what people’s day to day life was like in the past.”  So that’s one group of people who don’t pathologize hypergraphia.